Monthly Archives: October 2017

Some useful vitamins that lower blood sugar

Certain vitamins and minerals have been found beneficial in lowering blood sugar and thus useful in the treatment of diabetes.

Vitamin B complex – Vitamins of the B group are valuable in the treatment of diabetes. Despite and adequate intake of these vitamins, diabetics often have abnormally small amounts of vitamin B in their blood because of high urinary loss of exhibit symptoms of vitamin B deficiency. Marked clinical improvement has been reported in patients of diabetes with only 16000 units of daily supplements of vitamin B complex. Because these vitamins help reduce blood fat and cholesterol, they should be generously supplied at all times.

Thiamine or Vitamin B1 – Of the various vitamins of the B group, thiamine or vitamin B1 and pyridoxine or vitamin B6 is of special value in diabetes. Diabetic diet inadequate in vitamin B1, often leads to the development of neuritis, which is relieved as soon as large amounts of this vitamin are given. Vitamin B1 is said to be particularly valuable in preventing damage to the brain during diabetic acidosis. The greater the insulin requirement, the higher is the requirement for vitamin B1, pantothenic acid or vitamin B5 and biotin or vitamin B8.

The primary natural vegetable sources of thiamine are wheat germ, brewer’s yeast, the outer layers of rice, wheat and other whole grain cereals, pulses, nuts, peas, lime, legumes, dark green leafy vegetables, banana and apple. Those of pantothenic acid are wheat germ, whole grain bread, green vegetables and peanuts. Biotin is found in brewer’s yeast, rice bran, rice germ, rice polishing and peanut butter.

Pyridoxine or Vitamin B6 – When diet is inadequate in vitamin B6 or pyridoxine, and essential amino acid tryptophan, is converted into a substance known as xanthurenic acid. It has been shown in laboratory experiments that xanthurenic acid tends to damage the pancreatic tissue.

Diabetics who have been given 50 mg of vitamin B6 daily have shown a rapid and marked decrease in urinary xanthurenic acid. In one case, the quantity dropped almost 97 percent the first day. Total absence of urinary xanthurenic acid amongst those who continued with a daily dosage of 10 to 20 mg of this vitamin indicated that none was being formed in the body. Diabetics are thus greatly helped by a liberal intake of vitamin B6. The main natural sources of pyridoxine are milk, brewer’s yeast, cereals, legumes, green leafy vegetables and carrot.

Discover how to prevent it developing into type 2 diabetes

Pre-diabetes means you probably have higher than normal blood-sugar levels but, fortunately, not high enough to be classed as being diabetic.

However it does mean that you are susceptible to developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease if you do nothing about it.

Unfortunately, more often than not, there are no physical symptoms to warn you if you are in a pre-diabetes stage. So it’s worth getting yourself checked out and, if you fall into any of these categories, ask your physician if you are likely to be at risk of pre-diabetes:

* You are overweight and you are aged 45 or older

* Your weight is OK and you’re aged 45+. Ask your doctor during a routine check-up if testing is appropriate for you

* You are an adult under age 45 and you are overweight

* You have high blood pressure; low HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides

* Your family has a history of diabetes

* There’s a history of gestational diabetes in your family

* You have given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds

* You belong to an ethnic or minority group that has a high risk for diabetes, such as African American, American Indian, Asian American, Pacific Islander, or Hispanic American/Latino.

The good news is, if after testing you discover that you do have pre-diabetes; your blood-sugar levels are rather higher than they should be but not in the diabetes range, you can take positive action to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

* Reduce the amount on your plate – eating just a little less helps reduce your risk factor.

* Avoid snacks; if you must snack go for a healthy rather than sugar-laden option.

* Drink a glass of water 10 minutes before eating to take the edge of your appetite so you don’t overindulge in food.

* Choose whole-grain foods or sugar-free foods.

* Take a little more exercise; such as walking up the stairs instead of taking the lift or an escalator.

* Don’t shop for food when you are feeling hungry. You’ll be more tempted to buy the foods that increase your blood-sugars; add on weight and generally create a higer risk of moving from your pre-diabetes state into being a fully diagnosed type 2 diabetic.

Taking these and other simple actions can reduce your risk of turning pre-diabetes into type 2 diabetes.

Managing Diabetes Made Easier

The management of diabetes is progressively evolving. The latest medical and technological advances-including ones involving the Internet-have begun providing the 18.2 million Americans affected by this disease with the kind of freedom few dreamed of not all that long ago.

Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body doesn’t produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert glucose into energy. Since over time the high blood sugar levels associated with diabetes-the nation’s fifth-leading cause of death by disease-can lead to complications of the eyes, blood vessels, nerves, kidneys and other organs, anything that would ease the typical daily regimen of insulin injections and the like would be most welcome by patients.

According to experts at the Mayo Clinic, that “simplification” is exactly what’s happening. The Food & Drug Administration, for example, is in the process of approving both insulin patches and inhalants as alternative delivery methods to insulin injections. Breakthroughs in blood glucose monitoring that would allow continuous testing throughout the day are currently in development.

And then there’s the Internet. Unlike in the past, the latest advances, treatment and disease management recommendations are now available on the Web sites of the American Diabetes Association, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and countless others. Beyond that, people with diabetes are being helped in managing their disease through the conve-nient online ordering of necessary diabetic supplies, pharmaceuticals and equipment.

Better Living Now manages all insurance claims and paperwork so patients don’t have to. And they will contact physicians for prescription renewal and fill necessary medical orders with up to 90-day supplies. Members also receive special discounts when ordering online and can contact the company’s pharmacy with questions about their medication.

A Web site now offers all the medical supplies and medication needed to manage diabetes.

Sopranos Star Takes Control Of Diabetes

Aida Turturro, the actress who plays Janice Soprano on the HBO series “The Sopranos,” is one of the more than 20 million Americans who have diabetes.

Turturro was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (where the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells do not use the insulin properly) in 2000. For more than a year after her initial diagnosis she was in denial and did not take the proper steps-such as diet and exercise-to manage the disease.

Finally, her doctor told her that her blood sugar levels were too high and if she did not learn how to manage the disease, she would suffer serious complications.

“As soon as I started learning more about the potential complications of the disease, I realized I should have taken action sooner,” said Turturro. “It is scary what can happen to you if you do not take control of your diabetes.”

Turturro was among the more than 50 percent of diabetes patients whose A1C levels are above the target goal of 7 percent as established by the American Diabetes Association. Patients with diabetes should know their A1C level. It is a simple blood test that assesses glucose levels over a two- to three-month period.

In addition to her diet and exercise routines, Turturro worked with her doctor to develop a treatment regimen that was right for her. At first she was taking oral medications but was still unable to get her blood sugar levels under control. About two years ago, Turturro and her doctor added Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection), the once-daily, true 24-hour basal insulin, to her treatment plan.

With a treatment regimen that includes Lantus and other diabetes medications, Turturro achieves good blood glucose control with an A1C level below seven percent.

“Managing diabetes is not easy. What I have learned is the best way to manage the disease is by becoming educated, motivated and an advocate for yourself,” said Turturro. “It is a 24-hour disease and you have to put in a real effort to keep your blood sugar levels under control.”

Note to Editors: Important Safety Information for Lantus

Lantus is indicated for once-daily subcutaneous administration, at the same time each day, for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients (6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes mellitus or adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who require basal (long-acting) insulin for the control of hyperglycemia. Lantus must not be diluted or mixed with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Lantus is contraindicated in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or the excipients. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin, including Lantus. As with all insulins, the timing of hypoglycemia may differ among various insulin formulations. Glucose monitoring is recommended for all patients with diabetes. Any change of insulin type and/or regimen should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.Concomitant oral antidiabetes treatment may need to be adjusted. Other adverse events commonly associated with Lantus include the following: lipodystrophy, skin reactions (such as injection-site reaction, pruritus, rash) and allergic reactions.

Support Of Diabetes From The Family

Not to be missed in the treatment of diabetes is support from the people we love. In truth, one reference notes that “the quality of a family’s time can be mutually beneficial” in managing diabetes in the family with juveniles or adults.

It is beneficial when those in the family are trained about diabetes. Knowledge will lend a hand of support to the diabetic. You’ll recognize imperative symptoms, and know how to take action. One family who offers support to their diabetic relatives noted how they can recognize changes in each other when medical treatment is needed.

Being able to detect symptoms like being sweaty, shaky or impatient will help caring family members to take charge of any diabetic situations.

Loving family members must strive to be supportive and patient with their diabetic family members. This support can be invaluable coming from within the family for the diabetic. The greatest support group is at home with love and care. Family and friends in addition want to understand that as blood-sugar levels fluctuate, diabetes can affect one’s moods.

A family member would never want to belittle or make fun of a spouse, sibling, daughter or son because of diabetes. Too, remembering that they have limitations on what they eat we may also follow their same diet plan. Never would we want to tempt them to eat something that could make them sick.

Remember you are an important part of your diabetic relatives successful treatment. They may not show it but you mean a lot to them. If you just give them some words of encouragement like they are doing great what a world of difference that will mean to them. Treat them like normal people with circumstances to care for.

Diabetes can be managed effectively, specially if the sufferer has cooperation from friends and family.

Prescribed foods for diabetic patients

French bean

French bean is one of the most commonly used vegetables all over the world. There are several varieties, the most widely used being the French bean, is also known as common or kidney bean.

Beans are high in carbohydrates and fiber. They should be eaten liberally to keep diabetes under control.

A decoction prepared from the beans is an excellent remedy for diabetes. This decoction is prepared by boiling 60 grams of fresh kidney bean pods, after removing their seeds, in four liters of water on a slow fire for four hours. It is then strained through fine muslin cloth and allowed to stand for eight hours. One glass of this decoction every two hours during the day is recommended. This treatment should be continued for four to eight weeks along with the prescribed diet restrictions. The decoction must be made fresh every day, as it loses it medicinal value after 24 hours.

The juice extracted from French beans is also valuable in controlling diabetes. It stimulates the production of insulin. This juice is generally used in combination with the juice of Brussels sprouts. The patient must, however be on a controlled diet.

Dr. James Anderson of the Human Nutrition Research Center of the US Department of Agriculture insists that the same foods that lower cholesterol and fight heart disease are also excellent for diabetics, who are at high risk of heart disease. This puts foods like beans that are high in soluble fiber in “highly recommended” category. Dr. Anderson quotes confirm that high fiber foods significantly reduce blood sugar along with cholesterol.

Lettuce

Lettuce belongs to that group of vegetables that contain three percent or less of carbohydrates. It is among the important foods that can be prescribed for diabetes. Diabetics can use it freely.

Onion

The onion has been used as a treatment for diabetes since ancient times. Recent research studies have proved that this pungent vegetable can lower blood sugar in diabetes. In recent investigations in India, scientists fed onion juice and whole onions in does of 25 to 200 grams to a group of diabetics and found that the greater the dose, the faster the decrease in blood sugar levels. It made no difference whether the onion was eaten raw or cooked. It was found that the onion affected the liver’s metabolism of glucose, or release of insulin, or prevented the destruction of insulin.
The probable active hypoglycaemic substances in the onion are allyl, propyl, disulphide and allicin. In fact, as early as 1923, researchers had detected the blood sugar lowering properties of onion. And in the 1960s, scientists isolated anti-diabetic compounds from onions, which are similar to the common anti-diabetic pharmaceuticals that are used to stimulate insulin synthesis and release.

Soya bean

Soya bean is one of the most nutritious foods of the great value in the treatment of diabetes. The journal of the American Medical Association quotes from an article by Dr. Christian Becker published in an authoritative German Medical journal. In this article, Dr. Becker points out that the Soya bean bread is a valuable food for diabetics. It contains very little starch, but is rich in fat and protein, both the excellent quality. Soya bean has steadily grown in importance from a therapeutic point of view, since 1910 when studies indicated it to be a valuable part of diabetic diet. Its usefulness in diabetes is attributable not only to its richness in protein and its palatability, but also to its ability to cause,

Other beneficial foods for diabetic patients

1. Almond: The use of almond, after its oil has been extracted, is considered beneficial in the treatment of diabetes. It does not contain any starch.

2. Banana: Bananas are believed to the useful in controlling diabetes. According to the Journal of American Medical Association, “Banana and Skimmed milk furnish a simple and effective method for weight reduction in treating diabetic patients”. Unripe bananas, cooked as a vegetable, are considered especially valuable in this disease.

3. Buttermilk: The use of the buttermilk has been found beneficial in the treatment of diabetes. Lactic Acid contained in it stimulates the secretion of the pancreas and thereby helps control blood sugar levels.

4. Flour: Certain whole grain cereals also help to lower blood sugar in diabetes. A mixture of certain flours made from cereals, grains, legumes, and pulses are especially beneficial. One such mixture can be prepared by combining the flour of soyabean, black gram, jowar, bajra, Bengal gram, wheat bran and barley. This mixed flour can be used for preparing chapattis.

5. Legumes: Lentils and other legumes are considered valuable in diabetes. According to American journal of Clinical Nutrition, they are specially effective in the diet of diabetes patients because of their slow release of energy.

6. Sour Fruits: Certain tart or sour fruits have proved to be valuable in stimulating the pancreas and increase the production of insulin. These fruits include sour apple and sour citrus fruits, which can invigorate pancreas.

7. Teas: Certain types of teas are considered beneficial in the treatment of diabetes. Tea prepared from parsley has been found to lower blood sugar. Certain communities use tea made from tender leaves of walnut for controlling diabetes.

8. Tomato: Tomato with its low carbohydrates contents is very good food for diabetic patients and for those who want to reduce their body weight. It is said to be very effective in controlling the percentage of sugar in the urine of diabetic patients.

Start taking magnesium and chromium rich diets to control your diabetes

Manganese – Manganese is vital in the production of natural insulin and therefore important in the treatment of diabetes. It is found in citrus fruits, in the outer covering of nuts, grains and in the green leaves of edible plants.

The loss of magnesium in diabetic ketosis has been known for many years. About 37 percent of infants born to diabetic mothers have been found to be lacking in this mineral. It has also been found that children aged five to 18 years with well-controlled type-1 diabetes have lows serum magnesium values.

Magnesium – Magnesium also decreases the need for vitamin B6 and if it is increased in the diet, the amount of xanthurenic acid in the blood is reduced, even without vitamin B6 supplement. Moreover, magnesium is also necessary to active enzymes containing vitamin B6. Blood magnesium being particularly low in diabetic, it may be reasonably inferred that diabetes can result from a combined deficiency of vitamin B6 and magnesium. It may therefore, be advisable for any person with diabetes or a family history of the disease to take the at least 500 mg of magnesium and 10 mg of B6 daily.

Magnesium is widely distributed in foods. It forms part of the chlorophyll in green leaves. Other good sources of this mineral are nuts, Soya bean, alfalfa, apple, fig, lemon, peach, almond, whole grains, brown rice, sunflower seeds and sesame seeds.

Chromium – According to Dr. Richard A. Anderson, at the U. S. Department of Agriculture’s Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, whatever the blood sugar problem, chromium tends to normalize it. Dr. Anderson believes that increased prevalence of type-2 diabetes is partly due to a deficiency of chromium in the diet.

Chromium has been found beneficial in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Columbia University scientists, in a study reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition established chromium’s benefits for type-2 diabetes. They confirmed that chromium enhances insulin production in the body. Some other researchers have also confirmed that chromium helps stabilize blood sugar and increases energy.

Studies have also revealed that chromium supplements control total cholesterol and triglyceride levels and raise the good or HDL cholesterol. In some patients with impaired glucose tolerance, especially children with protein malnutrition, glucose tolerance showed improvement after they were given chromium supplements.

The recommended daily allowance of chromium is 50 to 100 micrograms. Some foods rich in chromium, besides broccoli, are whole grain cereals, nuts, mushrooms, rhubarb, Bengal gram, kidney beans, Soya beans, black gram, betel leaves, bottle gourd, corn oil, brewer’s yeast, pomegranate and pineapple.

Toddlers with Diabetes: Caring for the Littlest Patients

Toddlers with diabetes are suffering from Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes or diabetes juvenile. The number of children under the age of five being diagnosed with diabetes juvenile has almost doubled in the past five years. Caring for toddlers is a challenge under the best of circumstances, and toddlers with diabetes need even more special care and attention.

Symptoms

First, if you are wondering whether your toddler has diabetes in the first place, here are some signs to look for:

•often complains of feeling thirsty
•hungry more often
•suddenly loses weight
•urinates more than usual, diapers more wet than usual
•occasional fruity smelling breath

If you notice any of these symptoms in your child, discuss with your doctor the possibility you have a toddler with diabetes.

Special challenges

You or your caregiver will have to closely monitor your child’s blood sugar throughout the day to be sure it stays within a safe range. Ideally this means 6-12 mmol just before meals.

Toddlers with diabetes also require daily insulin shots, which can be traumatic for you as well as your child! When administering both finger pricks for the blood sugar tests and the insulin shots, you should be as quick and calm as possible about the procedure. If your child is playing, go where he or she is rather than having them come to you. That helps establish the procedure as just a normal part of their day.

Of course, your child will resist these procedures, and it can be hard for parents and caregivers to remember they are doing this for the child’s health. It must be done, however, and you may have to learn to restrain the child gently. It also helps to give them a big hug and a kiss after it’s finished to make sure they understand you still love them even though this hurt a bit.

Another problem is that toddlers with diabetes can’t tell you when they are feeling the effects of low blood sugar, which is another reason for careful monitoring.
Toddlers in general can be picky eaters, and toddlers with diabetes are no different. The challenge here is in making sure that all your alternatives fit within a healthy and appropriate diabetic diet. Have as wide a selection of those foods available as possible so that when they do refuse certain foods, you can tempt them with an appropriate alternative.

Toddlers with diabetes should otherwise develop the same way, and at the same rate, as other children of their age. So as long as you take the necessary precautions to treat the diabetes, and your child seems normal in all other ways, there’s no reason why he or she shouldn’t be a perfectly healthy and happy child.