Monthly Archives: September 2017

More Aware Of Diabetes-Heart Disease Link

With diabetes on the rise, doctors are extremely concerned about associated risks such as heart disease and stroke, which together kill two out of three people with diabetes. Fortunately, a recent study indicates that more people with diabetes are making the link between diabetes and their increased risk for heart disease and stroke.

According to a 2005 awareness survey conducted by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and American College of Cardiology (ACC), 45 percent of people with diabetes understand their increased risk for heart disease, which is up from 35 percent in 2001.

Experts believe even more awareness is needed, however. The ADA and ACC continue to work together to share important information, tools and resources to encourage people with diabetes-and health care providers-to learn more about the impact of diabetes on the heart.

Other findings from the 2005 ADA/ACC awareness survey show:

• 69 percent know they may develop high blood pressure (38 percent in 2001).

• 64 percent know they are at risk for cholesterol problems (37 percent in 2001).

Importantly, more people with diabetes are talking to their health care providers about managing diabetes comprehensively:

• 45 percent of people with diabetes now have a goal for blood glucose levels (30 percent in 2003).

• 57 percent have a goal for blood pressure (34 percent in 2003).

• 61 percent have a goal for cholesterol (34 percent in 2003).

These figures are encouraging, but awareness may not be moving fast enough to keep pace with the growing prevalence of diabetes.

Recent statistics indicate diabetes has risen by over 14 percent since last estimates in 2003. The need for increased education and awareness about the link between diabetes and heart disease is now more critical than ever.

Armed with the best information, people with diabetes can properly manage their diabetes, understand their risks for complications such as heart disease and stroke, and take action to live a longer, healthier life.

Recommended foods for diabetes

Brewer’s Yeast

Brewer’s yeast is a wonder food. It is rich in traces of mineral chromium. This mineral helps the pancreas produce more insulin. It is one of the best supports for normal handling of sugar by the body. According to an article by Dr. Richard J. Doisy and others, which appeared in the Medical World News, Brewer’s yeast has lowered the insulin requirements of many diabetes patients.

Broccoli

Broccoli, a close relation of the cauliflower, has long been a popular food in Europe. This vegetable has proved to be an effective anti-diabetic food. It is rich source of chromium, a trace mineral that seems to lower blood sugar. This trace mineral regulates blood sugar, thereby often reducing the medication and insulin needs of diabetes. In cases of mild diabetes, chromium may prevent the onset of the full-fledged disease. If a person’s glucose tolerance is on border, chromium can help control it. Even low blood sugar levels can be brought to normal with chromium.

Curd

Curd injects friendly bacteria in to the digestive system that stimulate the pancreas. It also washes the pancreas of its acids and wastes. These cleansing actions enable the pancreas to perform much better and thereby help in the production of insulin.

Garlic

In scientific trials garlic and its constituents have been found to lower blood sugar in diabetes. This vegetable is rich in potassium, which effectively replaces the large quantities of potassium lost in the urine of diabetics. It also contains zinc and sulphur, which are constituents of insulin. Some authorities believe that low levels of zinc may be one of the factors responsible for the onset of diabetes. Garlic also contains manganese, a deficiency of which can contribute towards diabetes.

Garlic constituents appear to act by blocking the inactivation of insulin in the liver. The result is higher blood insulin levels and lower blood sugar.

Garlic has other benefits for diabetes besides lowering blood sugar. It prevents arteriosclerosis, which is a common complication of diabetes and relieves body paid. Diabetics can take the equivalent of one or two cloves of garlic a day in any form they like, either raw or cooked in food or as capsules. Garlic milk, prepared by adding four cloves of crushed garlic to 110 ml of milk, is one good way of taking garlic. The best way, however, is to chew raw garlic thoroughly first thing in the morning.

Bengal Gram

Bengal gram, also known as chickpea, is a widely used important component of Indian diet. It is a valuable anti-diabetic food. Experiments have shown that the oral ingestion of the water extract of Bengal gram increases the utilization of glucose in diabetics as well as normal people. In a study conducted at Central Food Technological Research Institute in Mysore, the requirement of insulin of chronic diabetes patients decreased from 40 units a day to 20 units, when kept on a diet which included liberal supplements of Bengal gram extract.

Diabetic patients who are on a restricted diet, which does not severely limit the intake of carbohydrates but includes liberal amounts of Bengal gram extract, have shown considerable improvement in their fasting blood sugar levels, glucose tolerance, urinary excretion of sugar and general condition.

Bitter Gourd

The bitter gourd is a common vegetable cultivated extensively. It has excellent medicinal virtues. This vegetable has been used as fold medicine for diabetes from ancient times. Research has established that it contains insulin like principle designated as plant-insulin, which has been found beneficial in lowering blood and urine sugar levels.

Bitter gourd is thus and effective anti-diabetic food and should be included liberally in the diet of a diabetic.

Juice of three or four bitter gourds taken every morning on an empty stomach has been found more effective than eating fruits. The seeds of bitter gourd can be powdered and added to regular meals. A decoction prepared by boiling chopped bitter gourd is water is equally effective, as is its dry powder mixed with liquid foods.

Bitter gourd is rich in all essential vitamins and minerals especially vitamins A, B1, B2, C and iron. Its regular use, therefore, prevents many complications associated with diabetes including hypertension, eye complications, neuritis and the defective metabolism of carbohydrates.

Black Gram

Black gram is a highly prized pulse in India. It is an anti diabetic food. Germinated black gram taken with half a cup of fresh bitter gourd juice, forms and effective remedy for treating mild types of diabetes. It should be taken once a day, for three to four months, with a restricted intake of carbohydrates.

In severe diabetes, regular use of this combination is an effective complement to other treatments. It is also a useful health food for preventing complications due to malnutrition in diabetes. Milk prepared by grinding sprouted whole black gram is also recommended for diabetics.

Groundnut

Groundnuts are valuable in diabetes. Eating a handful of groundnuts daily by diabetics will not only prevent malnutrition, particularly the deficiency of niacin,

Two Types Of Diabetes & How They Differ

There are two types of diabetes, which consists of Type I and Type II. It is important to understand the distinction between the two and how both are treated.

Type 1 diabetes is commonly found in children and/or adolescents, but may also occur in adults. With type 1 diabetes, there is almost always a complete deficiency of insulin. As a result, the most common treatment is insulin injections, a lifestyle that consists of both diet and exercise and regular monitoring of blood glucose levels with the use of blood testing monitors. Patients who have been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes can continue to enjoy a normal life providing they continue with their treatment and take special care to follow their doctor’s instructions and/or recommendation.

With type 2 diabetes, an individual’s insulin level is usually either normal or sometimes even elevated, but is not deficient. This form of diabetes is believed to be more complicated than type 1, but ironically is thought to be easier to treat. Because insulin is still being produced inside the body, type 2 diabetes often goes undetected for years. Symptoms are milder and may even be sporadic, which often reduces the level of concern. The main problem with type 2 diabetes going unnoticed is the potential for serious complications, including renal failure and coronary artery disease. The initial treatment phase of type 2 diabetes will likely include a lifestyle adjustment to feature increased physical activity and a diet that is geared toward weight loss. The next step, if necessary, will be medication and possibly insulin therapy if needed.

Both types of diabetes require that the patient maintain normal blood glucose levels in an effort to reduce the possibility of organ damage, including eyesight, kidney, blood circulation, etc. In order for this to occur, patients must carefully monitor their food intake and make sure to participate in regular exercise, all the while continuing to monitor their blood glucose level.

As of 2006, there is no known cure for diabetes. A chronic disease that effects many, diabetes is best treated through patient education, nutrition, self awareness and long-term care. In addition, patients are often urged to be aware of other symptoms that may indicate complications arising from diabetes.

The contents of this article are to be used for informational purposes only. It should not be used in conjunction with, or in place of, professional medical advice relating to diabetes. This article must not be used as a basis for diagnosing or treating diabetes, but rather an informational source designed to explain the difference between the two types. For further information, a diagnosis or recommended treatment method for diabetes, individuals should consult a licensed physician.

Quick Guide To Understanding Your Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a fatlike substance which is found in the tissue of humans and other animals. It plays important roles in cell membrane structure, certain hormones, and manufacturing vitamin D. Our livers procude all of the cholesterol that we need for these important functions. Excess cholesterol can contribute to antherosclerosis or clogging of the arteries.

Cholesterol is found in all food from animal sources: meat, eggs, fish, poultry, and dairy products. Some animal foods contribute substantial amounts of cholesterol, while others contribute only small amounts. There is no cholesterol in any plant-derived foods. Excess dietary cholesterol can increase blood cholesterol, which can increase the risk of coronary heart disease.

You’ll often hear cholesterol referred to as either good cholesterol or bad cholesterol. To help in our understanding of the two and their differences, we first need to define the word “lipoproteins.” These are packets of proteins, cholesterol, and triglycerides that are assembled by the liver and circulated in the blood. When we talk about LDL cholesterol, we’re referring to low density lipoprotein cholesterol. And when we refer to HDL cholesterol, we’re referring to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.

LDL cholesterol, often referred to as “bad cholesterol,” carried cholesterol through the bloodstream, dropping it off where it’s needed for cell building and leaving behind any unused residue of cholesterol as plague on the walls of the arteries.

HDL cholesterol, often referred to as “good cholesterol,” picks up the cholesterol which has been deposited in the arteries and brings it back to the liver for reprocessing or excretion.

You can easily understand why there’s a distinction between good and bad cholesterol now that you understand the unique functions of each.

Saturated fats are usually from animal products such as lard, fats in meat and chicken skin, butter, ice cream, milk fat, cheese, etc. Tropical oils such as coconut oil and palm oil are also highly saturated. These fats are usually solid at room temperature. You’ve undoubtedly heard from somewhere that you should keep your saturated fats to a minimum, but do you know why? Because these fats tend to increase your blood cholesterol levels, which in turn increases your risk of coronary heart disease.

Hydrogenated fats are those liquid vegetable oils than have been turned into solid saturated fats through a chemical process. These fats also contribute to your blood cholesterol levels.

Polyunsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature and derived from plants. Examples: safflower, corn, soybean, cottenseed and sunflower oils. Polyunsaturated fats tend to lower LDL (your bad cholesterol), but in excess can also lower your HDL (good cholesterol).

Monounsaturated fats are also derived from plants. These include olive oils and canola oil. Replacing the saturated fats in your diet with monounsaturated fats can help to lower your LDL (again, bad cholesterol) without lowering your HDL (good cholesterol). This is why monounsaturated fats are a healthy choice for your heart. However, keep in mind that too much of any form of fat can contribute to obesity.

The bottomline: whenever you’re making a choice about the fats you use, keep in mind that good heart health depends on keeping your LDL cholesterol low while maintaining your HDL cholesterol.